The Animal Turn

S3E8: Urban Animal History with Philip Howell

July 22, 2021 Claudia Hirtenfelder Season 3 Episode 8
The Animal Turn
S3E8: Urban Animal History with Philip Howell
Show Notes

In this episode Claudia speaks to Philip Howell about urban animal history. Together they discuss the significance of geography in prying apart the many histories of animals, how attention to animal stories gives one a better appreciation for ‘the urban’ and challenges humanist ideas of history. They also touch on the stimulating experience of searching for, finding, and trying to understand animals in the archives.  

 

Date recorded: 20 April 2021

 

Philip Howell is a lecturer in the Department of Geography at the University of Cambridge, UK. He is an historical and cultural geographer, and has written about the regulation of sexuality in Victorian Britain, and on the relations between literature and geography. But for 20 years he has been researching “animal geography,” focusing on the place of the dog in Victorian society, but also taking in the politics of animals in contemporary society. Find out more about Philip here and you can reach him via email (pmh1000@cam.ac.uk)

 

Featured: 

Flush and the Banditti: Dog-stealing in Victorian London; At Home and Astray; Animal History in the Modern Cityby Philip Howell; The curious case of the Croydon cat-killer: producing predators in the multi-species metropolis; Black Protest and the Man on Horseback: Race, Animality, and Equestrian Counter-Conduct by Philip Howell and Ilanah Taves; Animal Spaces, Beastly Places: New Geographies of Human-animal Relations edited by Chris Philo and Chris Wilbert; The Urbanization of the Eastern Grey Squirrel in the United States by Etienne Benson; About LookingJohn Berger; Foucault and Animals by Dinesh Wadiwel and Matthew Chrulew; La Vie Des Hommes Infämes by Michael Foucault. 

 

The Animal Turn is part of the  iROAR, an Animals Podcasting Network and can also be found on A.P.P.L.E, Twitter, and Instagram